Julia Holter's second album, Ekstasis, is a collection of songs written and recorded across the span of three years. Ekstasis marks a return to the playful searching of her 2007 Eating the Stars EP, but guided by newly-learned disciplines, slightly better technology, and nearly limitless home recording time. While Ekstasis reflects the conventions of her classical training, the album is also uncannily, if unknowingly, poppy. Holter's approach to crafting the songs of Ekstasis centered around what she describes as, "open ear decision: what seemed to sound best for that moment."
Julia Holter's second album, Ekstasis, is a collection of songs written and recorded across the span of three years. Ekstasis marks a return to the playful searching of her 2007 Eating the Stars EP, but guided by newly-learned disciplines, slightly better technology, and nearly limitless home recording time. While Ekstasis reflects the conventions of her classical training, the album is also uncannily, if unknowingly, poppy. Holter's approach to crafting the songs of Ekstasis centered around what she describes as, "open ear decision: what seemed to sound best for that moment."
654367858226

Details

Format: CD
Label: RVGI
Catalog: 78582
Rel. Date: 03/26/2012
UPC: 654367858226

Ekstasis
Artist: Julia Holter
Format: CD
New: Available $14.98
Wish

Available Formats and Editions

DISC: 1

1. Marienbad
2. Our Sorrows
3. In the Same Room
4. Boy in the Moon
5. Fur Felix
6. Goddess Eyes II
7. Moni Mon Amie
8. Four Gardens
9. Goddess Eyes I 1
10. This Is Ekstasis

More Info:

Julia Holter's second album, Ekstasis, is a collection of songs written and recorded across the span of three years. Ekstasis marks a return to the playful searching of her 2007 Eating the Stars EP, but guided by newly-learned disciplines, slightly better technology, and nearly limitless home recording time. While Ekstasis reflects the conventions of her classical training, the album is also uncannily, if unknowingly, poppy. Holter's approach to crafting the songs of Ekstasis centered around what she describes as, "open ear decision: what seemed to sound best for that moment."